Consumer Kosher

What’s The Truth About…Glatt Kosher

September 13, 2006

Misconception : “Glatt Kosher” means something like “extra kosher” and applies to chicken and fish as well as meat.

Fact: Glatt is Yiddish for smooth, and in the context of kashrut it means that the lungs of the animal were smooth, without any adhesions that could potentially prohibit the animal as a treifa, an issue only applicable to animals, not fowl or non-meat products.

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What’s The Truth About … Nikkur Achoraim?

September 13, 2006

Misconception: Nikkur achoraim (rendering the hindquarters of an animal fit for kosher consumption) is a Sephardic practice that is banned by rabbinic fiat for Ashkenazim and thus not performed in the United States. Fact: There is no such ban, and nikkur was practiced in many Ashkenazic communities into the twentieth century. The practice of some communities to refrain from eating hindquarters, owing to the difficulty in excising the forbidden sections, continues to exist among both Ashkenazim and Sephardim.

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An RFR’s Notes On Dettling Kirsch

July 18, 2006

In Switzerland it is inconceivable to celebrate a joyous occasion without a glass of kirsch – cherry brandy. For tourists, it is compulsory to take home postcards of the Alps, a package of Swiss cheese and … a bottle of kirsch [German for “cherry” ].

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The Hole Truth: Together, Bagels & The OU Have An Unbeatable Personality

July 18, 2006

There is a definite connection between New Yorkers and the New York City bagel. New Yorkers are tough and firm on the outside but gentle and caring on the inside. A real New York City bagel too, is hard and crispy on the outside but moist and chewy on the inside. New Yorkers are shiny and flamboyant on the outside but good old down-to-earth and friendly on the inside. A real New York City bagel too, is burnished and slick on the outside but mushy and snug on the inside.

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Dairy Labeling Policy

June 20, 2006

The Orthodox Union requires the use of the OU-D symbol on products that contain dairy ingredients.

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Dairy English Muffins

June 9, 2006

The OU certifies many brands of English Muffins which are labeled OU-D and many others that are OU-Pareve. In light of the issur to produce dairy bread (Shulchan Aruch 97:1), how can the OU certify muffins as dairy? The following two answers have been suggested to this question, and each is followed by Rav Schachter’s comments: Muffins have a unique shape.

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Kaskeset: Part Two

June 9, 2006

In part one of this article, we discussed what the requirements are for fish to be kosher (i.e. that the fish needs to have “kaskeses” and what is a “kaskeses” ), as well as some of the common mistakes made in trying to determine which fish would qualify as kosher. In this article, we will discuss two practical methods to determine if a fish is kosher.

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OU’s Longtime RFR’s: Kashrut Supervision Legends In Their Own Time

May 2, 2006

The Reasons behind a thriving organization’s success lie squarely at the doors of its trailblazers, the dedicated forefathers who laid the essential groundwork. In the booming OU Kashrut Division’s case, you could try knocking on the two Giants of Kashrut’s doors, but you probably won’t find them home; they’re on the road happily priming the next generation of experts.

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Why The OU Bugged A Mathematician Or Why I’m Going To Think Twice Before Buying Any Packaged Product

May 1, 2006

Did you know that when you purchase packaged fruits and vegetables, you are buying food that may contain bugs? They’re not listed on the label. You never see it mentioned on TV commercials and in newspaper advertisements. But they might be in there.

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Here’s The Buzz On Certifying Veggies As Insect-Free

May 1, 2006

Vegetables have forever been a basic staple of a person’s diet. Rich in fiber and vitamins, God’s gift to mankind is essential to maintaining one’s health. Unexpectedly, certain types of vegetables also provide a good source of protein. Vegetables rich in protein are those that provide a safe haven for insects, with the protein found in the insect itself. This trend has made the kosher certification of vegetables highly challenging. Insects are naturally found in the environment and in farm fields. However, kosher law strictly prohibits the consumption of insects.

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