Industrial Kosher

Marketing Tips: If you’ve Got It—Flaunt It

August 1, 2005

Letting your customers know that you are OU certified should be as much a part of your marketing strategy as any other significant benefit your product offers. Be sure the OU logo is clearly visible in your advertising—either on the product label or elsewhere in the ad. 3 Feature OU certification on your website. Ask…

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The Unauthorized Kosher Symbol

June 7, 2005

The world of kosher certified food has and continues to experience tremendous expansion. Many food products that were never before kosher certified are now appearing with kosher symbols. While such proliferation is generally a good thing for the kosher consumer, an unfortunate side effect of this proliferation has been an increase in the number of products that are misrepresented to the public as being kosher certified.

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Ever Hear of Pasta Ice Cream?

April 4, 2005

Why Dairy Products Must Be Kosher for Passover

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How Our Seafood Producers Navigate the Waters of Kosher for Passover Supervision

April 4, 2005

For the Jewish people, Passover is not just another holiday. Our reliving of the Exodus from Egypt is also a time when families make time to be together and indulge in our favorite national pastime… eating. Besides matzah, wine and chicken soup, few foods conjure up traditional feelings more than the fish products our families…

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The Modern Passover Marketing Story

April 4, 2005

Rabbis travel half way around the globe for special production runs that may last no more than a day, although preparation may take as much as a week. Major national brands remove ingredients from their products, often replacing them with such popular Passover ingredients as apple cider and potato starch, all in deference to the…

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Behind the “Chometz-Free” Certification

April 4, 2005

For industrial products, the familiar OUP (kosher for Passover) can sometimes be replaced by a “chometz-free” certification. What does this mean? To find out, studying some terminology will be in order. CHOMETZ Fermented grains (wheat, oats, barley, rye and spelt), all proscribed–that is, forbidden—on Passover; KITNIYOS Legume products, also not for Passover use, but of…

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A Chemical Reaction at Passover

April 4, 2005

TO A LARGE EXTENT, the chemical industry is free from Passover issues because so many chemicals are exclusively mineral-based, as are the processing aids. However, it would be inaccurate to say that the regulations of Passover do not impact at all.We will focus on two critical areas: flocculants and alcohols. A flocculant is an agent…

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Meeting the Challenge of Certifying Flavors for Passover

April 4, 2005

FLAVORS—THE MYSTERIOUS ingredients added to almost all processed foods that completes the gastronomic experience create unique challenges for Passover certification. Due to the nature of flavor chemicals and the complexity of their manufacture, every chemical in flavors requires individual investigation to determine its Passover status. No master list is available for the raw materials that…

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The Kosher for Passover Snack: A Rarity no More

April 4, 2005

Passover is a holiday steeped in great tradition. Our ancestors, living in a world without manufacturing processes, prepared all the food used for Passover from scratch, involving great time and painstaking effort. Producing any more than the bare minimum that was needed for the holiday was out of the question.“You will survive without snacks or…

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Not a Half-Baked Idea: Baking for Passover Offers Tasty Rewards

April 4, 2005

Passover is a time when the Kosher consumer faces additional dietary restrictions. Leavened bread, termed chometz, is forbidden. The well-known traditional baked staple permitted and associated with Passover is matzah, which is baked from dough that does not rise. The dough used for matzah contains no yeast, just flour and water, and must be baked…

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