Kosher for Consumers

Recent Articles

Ask the OU Rabbis Prog in S.FL Enlightens and Entertains

The show must go on….and on: Rabbis Chaim Loike (left) and Dovid Jenkins continue to answer questions following their presentations at the Ask the OU Rabbis session in South Florida.

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Lo Basi Ella L’orer – Limitations of ChaNaN

ChaNaN does not apply to a davar heter. This is because chatichah na’ases neveila, as it name implies, means that the entire item that absorbed ta’am of issur becomes like a neveila. Since one must refrain from eating the item, we view it as becoming 100% assur. This sevara obviously does not apply to a davar heter such as kosher milk, kosher meat or kosher fish. Therefore, if 1 gallon of kosher milk is mixed with 10 gallons of water, and this mixture is then mixed into 100 gallons of water, we would not say ChaNaN and the milk would be batel b’shishim. Although, we would still insist on labeling this product as dairy, however there would be no need to kasher the equipment that came in contact with the mixture since the milk is already batel.

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Lo Basi Ella L’orer – Chatichah Na’ses Nevaila (Part I)

The minhag of Ashkenazim is to apply the halachos of Chatichah Na’ses Nevaila (ChaNaN) to all issurim, not just to basar b’cholov; (Rema Y.D. 92:4). Therefore, if one kezayis of any issur is cooked with 9 kezaysim of heter, we would have 10 kezeysim of issur. If these 10 kezaysim of issur, are subsequently cooked with 90 kezaysim of heter, although this is more than 60 times the original kezayis of issur, nevertheless because we say ChaNaN the entire mixture becomes assur. However, there is a distinction between the original 10 kezaysim and the subsequent 90 kezaysim. The original 10 kezaysim are assur mid’oraisah because they were mikabel ta’am issur (ta’am k’ikar); however, the later 90 kezaysim are only assur mid’Rabbanan because of ChaNaN b’shar issurim.

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Thou Shalt Not Commit Adulteration: Guarding Against the Dilution of Juice

The mission statement for the Technical Committee for the Juice Products Association, the major trade association of the juice industry, states that it is “dedicated to a level playing field for products containing juice” which means, as the statement goes on to say, that they “develop and validate methods for authenticating juice and juice products.”
The committee exists in response to the age-old problem of juice adulteration, which usually involves diluting “pure” fruit juice with other ingredients. Those ingredients may be water or sugar or sweeteners, as well as juices that are cheaper than the one being sold.

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Filling a Void in a Deep Gorge

Filling a Void in a Deep Gorge: Gorge Estate Vineyards of Washington State Enables Royal Wine to Enter New Territory for Premium Kosher Wines

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In India, Gherkin Manufacturers Are Not in a Pickle When Rabbi Tirnauer Is Around

The pickle industry, or should I say, the gherkin industry, is a thriving concern pleasing the palates of millions world-wide. Whether it is sliced, speared, hamburger-chip, sour, half-sour, kosher dill, to name just a few varieties, there is a flavor and shape for all sorts of taste buds — and a solid, steady demand for these delicious treats to boot. Quality standards assure a delectable product; OU supervision assures the highest standards of kosher as well.

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From the Plate of Caesar: The Kosher Status of the Flamingo

The flamingo is one of the most remarkable of the aquatic birds. There are five recognized species of flamingo, ranging in size from three to five feet tall. They are heavy for aquatic birds, some tipping the scales at nine pounds. While they are able to fly, they must be able to run a bit to gain the momentum to take to the air. Flamingos congregate in huge flocks, often comprised of thousands of individual birds, preferring to live in the shallow mudflats where algae and shrimp abound.

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Encyclopedia of Jewish Food: Matzah, Rugelach and a Whole Lot More

Communities can be defined by their food. American food — reflecting a penchant for accessibility, convenience, versatility, and portability -— reveals much about who we are and how we got here. Waves of various immigrants brought new dishes and ways of thinking about food to the repertoire.

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Editor’s Letter – Pareve: Neutral in Content, But Not on The Bottom Line

Pareve means that the food is “neutral,” neither dairy nor meat, which makes it that much more desirable. Kosher law allows for pareve foods to be consumed with all foods, whether meat, dairy or fish. Pareve salad dressing, frozen sorbet, chocolate mints, jams, grains, juices, soft drinks, or confectionary delicacies can be enjoyed with both a sumptuous steak dinner as well as with a refreshing dairy lunch. Essentially, pareve is the universal kosher category.

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Ask the Rabbi

Question:A customer has called us and would like us to run a new beverage product as OU, but without the D. Our plant is currently only approved for OUD usage. Is it possible for us to accommodate this customer and remove the D designation? How may it be done?

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